react-router - pass props to handler component

Kosmetika Source

I have the following structure for my React.js application using React Router:

var Dashboard = require('./Dashboard');
var Comments = require('./Comments');

var Index = React.createClass({
  render: function () {
    return (
        <div>
            <header>Some header</header>
            <RouteHandler />
        </div>
    );
  }
});

var routes = (
  <Route path="/" handler={Index}>
    <Route path="comments" handler={Comments}/>
    <DefaultRoute handler={Dashboard}/>
  </Route>
);

ReactRouter.run(routes, function (Handler) {
  React.render(<Handler/>, document.body);
});

I want to pass some properties into the Comments component.

(normally I'd do this like <Comments myprop="value" />)

What's the easiest and right way to do so with React Router?

javascriptpropertiesreactjsreact-router

Answers

answered 4 years ago ColCh #1


UPDATE since new release, it's possible to pass props directly via the Route component, without using a Wrapper

For example, by using render prop. Link to react router: https://reacttraining.com/react-router/web/api/Route/render-func

Code example at codesandbox: https://codesandbox.io/s/z3ovqpmp44

Component

    class Greeting extends React.Component {
        render() {
            const { text, match: { params } } = this.props;

            const { name } = params;

            return (
                <React.Fragment>
                    <h1>Greeting page</h1>
                    <p>
                        {text} {name}
                    </p>
                </React.Fragment>
            );
        }
    }

And usage

<Route path="/greeting/:name" render={(props) => <Greeting text="Hello, " {...props} />} />

OLD VERSION

My preferred way is wrap the Comments component and pass the wrapper as a route handler.

This is your example with changes applied:

var Dashboard = require('./Dashboard');
var Comments = require('./Comments');

var CommentsWrapper = React.createClass({
  render: function () {
    return (
        <Comments myprop="myvalue" />
    );
  }
});

var Index = React.createClass({
  render: function () {
    return (
        <div>
            <header>Some header</header>
            <RouteHandler />
        </div>
    );
  }
});

var routes = (
  <Route path="/" handler={Index}>
    <Route path="comments" handler={CommentsWrapper}/>
    <DefaultRoute handler={Dashboard}/>
  </Route>
);

ReactRouter.run(routes, function (Handler) {
  React.render(<Handler/>, document.body);
});

answered 4 years ago jul #2

You could also use the RouteHandler mixin to avoid the wrapper component and more easily pass down the parent's state as props:

var Dashboard = require('./Dashboard');
var Comments = require('./Comments');
var RouteHandler = require('react-router/modules/mixins/RouteHandler');

var Index = React.createClass({
      mixins: [RouteHandler],
      render: function () {
        var handler = this.getRouteHandler({ myProp: 'value'});
        return (
            <div>
                <header>Some header</header>
                {handler}
           </div>
        );
  }
});

var routes = (
  <Route path="/" handler={Index}>
    <Route path="comments" handler={Comments}/>
    <DefaultRoute handler={Dashboard}/>
  </Route>
);

ReactRouter.run(routes, function (Handler) {
  React.render(<Handler/>, document.body);
});

answered 3 years ago Meistro #3

You can pass in props via the <RouterHandler/> like this:

var Dashboard = require('./Dashboard');
var Comments = require('./Comments');

var Index = React.createClass({
  render: function () {
    var props = this.props; // or possibly this.state
    return (
        <div>
            <header>Some header</header>
            <RouteHandler {...props} />
        </div>
    );
  }
});

The downside of this is you are passing props indiscriminately. So Comments may end up receiving props that are really intended for a different component depending on your routes configuration. It's not a huge deal since props is immutable, but this can be problematic if two different components are expecting a prop named foo but with different values.

answered 3 years ago sigmus #4

Just a follow-up to ColCh's answer. It is quite easy to abstract the wrapping of a component:

var React = require('react');

var wrapComponent = function(Component, props) {
  return React.createClass({
    render: function() {
      return React.createElement(Component, props);
    }
  });
};

<Route path="comments" handler={wrapComponent(Comments, {myprop: value})}/>

I haven't tested this solution yet so any feedback is important.

It's important to note that with this method, any props sent via the Router (such as params) get overwritten / removed.

answered 3 years ago cachvico #5

You can pass props by passing them to <RouteHandler> (in v0.13.x) or the Route component itself in v1.0;

// v0.13.x
<RouteHandler/>
<RouteHandler someExtraProp={something}/>

// v1.0
{this.props.children}
{React.cloneElement(this.props.children, {someExtraProp: something })}

(from the upgrade guide at https://github.com/rackt/react-router/releases/tag/v1.0.0)

All child handlers will receive the same set of props - this may be useful or not depending on the circumstance.

answered 3 years ago Thomas E #6

If you'd rather not write wrappers, I guess you could do this:

class Index extends React.Component { 

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <h1>
        Index - {this.props.route.foo}
      </h1>
    );
  }
}

var routes = (
  <Route path="/" foo="bar" component={Index}/>
);

answered 3 years ago Zhiwei Huang #7

You can also combine es6 and stateless functions to get a much cleaner result:

import Dashboard from './Dashboard';
import Comments from './Comments';

let dashboardWrapper = () => <Dashboard {...props} />,
    commentsWrapper = () => <Comments {...props} />,
    index = () => <div>
        <header>Some header</header>
        <RouteHandler />
        {this.props.children}
    </div>;

routes = {
    component: index,
    path: '/',
    childRoutes: [
      {
        path: 'comments',
        component: dashboardWrapper
      }, {
        path: 'dashboard',
        component: commentsWrapper
      }
    ]
}

answered 3 years ago Andrew Khmylov #8

In 1.0 and 2.0 you can use createElement prop of Router to specify how exactly to create your target element. Documentation source

function createWithDefaultProps(Component, props) {
    return <Component {...props} myprop="value" />;
}

// and then    
<Router createElement={createWithDefaultProps}>
    ...
</Router>

answered 2 years ago mg74 #9

Wrap it with a stateless function component:

<Router>
  <Route 
    path='/' 
    component={({children}) => 
      <MyComponent myProp={'myVal'}>{children}</MyComponent/>
    }/>
</Router>

answered 2 years ago graham mendick #10

The problem with the React Router is that it renders your components and so stops you passsing in props. The Navigation router, on the other hand, lets you render your own components. That means you don't have to jump through any hoops to pass in props as the following code and accompanying JsFiddle show.

var Comments = ({myProp}) => <div>{myProp}</div>;

var stateNavigator = new Navigation.StateNavigator([
  {key:'comments', route:''}
]);

stateNavigator.states.comments.navigated = function(data) {
  ReactDOM.render(
    <Comments myProp="value" />,
    document.getElementById('content')
  );
}

stateNavigator.start();

answered 2 years ago min may #11

for the react-router 2.5.2,the solution is so easy:

    //someConponent
...
render:function(){
  return (
    <h1>This is the parent component who pass the prop to this.props.children</h1>
    {this.props.children && React.cloneElement(this.props.children,{myProp:'value'})}
  )
}
...

answered 2 years ago Nick #12

Using ES6 you can just make component wrappers inline:

<Route path="/" component={() => <App myProp={someValue}/>} >

If you need to pass children:

<Route path="/" component={(props) => <App myProp={someValue}>{props.children}</App>} >

answered 2 years ago Rajesh Naroth #13

Copying from the comments by ciantic in the accepted response:

<Route path="comments" component={() => (<Comments myProp="value" />)}/>

This is the most graceful solution in my opinion. It works. Helped me.

answered 2 years ago peter.mouland #14

React-router v4 alpha

now there is a new way, to do this, although very similar to the previous method.

import { Match, Link, Miss } from 'react-router';
import Homepage from './containers/Homepage';

const route = {
    exactly: true,
    pattern: '/',
    title: `${siteTitle} - homepage`,
    component: Homepage
  }

<Match { ...route } render={(props) => <route.component {...props} />} />

P.S. This works only in alpha version, and were removed after the v4 alpha release. In v4 latest, is once again , with the path and exact props.

react-lego an example app contains code that does exactly this in routes.js on its react-router-4 branch

answered 2 years ago Fran├žois Zaninotto #15

Using a custom route component, this is possible in React Router v3.

var Dashboard = require('./Dashboard');
var Comments = require('./Comments');
var routes = (
  <Route path="/" handler={Index}>
    <MyRoute myprop="value" path="comments" handler={Comments}/>
    <DefaultRoute handler={Dashboard}/>
  </Route>
);

As for the <MyRoute> component code, it should be something like:

import React from 'react';
import { Route } from 'react-router';
import { createRoutesFromReactChildren } from 'react-router/lib//RouteUtils';

const MyRoute = () => <div>&lt;MyRoute&gt; elements are for configuration only and should not be rendered</div>;

MyRoute.createRouteFromReactElement = (element, parentRoute) => {
    const { path, myprop } = element.props;
    // dynamically add crud route
    const myRoute = createRoutesFromReactChildren(
        <Route path={path} />,
        parentRoute
    )[0];
    // higher-order component to pass myprop as resource to components
    myRoute.component = ({ children }) => (
        <div>
            {React.Children.map(children, child => React.cloneElement(child, { myprop }))}
        </div>
    );
    return myRoute;
};

export default MyRoute;

For more details about the custom route component approach, check out my blog post on the subject: http://marmelab.com/blog/2016/09/20/custom-react-router-component.html

answered 2 years ago holyxiaoxin #16

For react router 2.x.

const WrappedComponent = (Container, propsToPass, { children }) => <Container {...propsToPass}>{children}</Container>;

and in your routes...

<Route path="/" component={WrappedComponent.bind(null, LayoutContainer, { someProp })}>
</Route>

make sure the 3rd param is an object like: { checked: false }.

answered 2 years ago Michael Hobbs #17

Use the component with or without router based on Rajesh Naroth answer.

class Index extends React.Component {

  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
  }
  render() {
    const foo = (this.props.route) ? this.props.route.foo : this.props.foo;
    return (
      <h1>
        Index - {foo}
      </h1>
    );
  }
}

var routes = (
  <Route path="/" foo="bar" component={Index}/>
);

Or your could do it this way:

export const Index = ({foo, route}) => {
  const content = (foo) ? foo : (route) ? route.foo : 'No content found!';
  return <h1>{content}</h1>
};

answered 2 years ago cgenco #18

Here's the cleanest solution I've come up with (React Router v4):

<Route
  path="/"
  component={props => <MyComponent {...props} foo="lol" />}
/>

MyComponent still has props.match and props.location, and has props.foo === "lol".

answered 1 year ago Daniel Reina #19

This is the solution from Rajesh, without the inconvenient commented by yuji, and updated for React Router 4.

The code would be like this:

<Route path="comments" render={(props) => <Comments myProp="value" {...props}/>}/>

Note that I use render instead of component. The reason is to avoid undesired remounting. I also pass the props to that method, and I use the same props on the Comments component with the object spread operator (ES7 proposal).

answered 1 year ago Chris #20

React Router v 4 solution

I stumbled upon this question earlier today, and here is the pattern I use. Hopefully this is useful to anyone looking for a more current solution.

I'm not sure if this is the best solution, but this is my current pattern for this. I have typically have a Core directory where I keep my commonly used components with their relevant configurations (loaders, modals, etc), and I include a file like this:

import React from 'react'
import { Route } from 'react-router-dom'

const getLocationAwareComponent = (component) => (props) => (
  <Route render={(routeProps) => React.createElement(component, 
{...routeProps, ...props})}/>
)

export default getLocationAwareComponent

Then, in the file in question, I'll do the following:

import React from 'react'
import someComponent from 'components/SomeComponent'
import { getLocationAwareComponent } from 'components/Core/getLocationAwareComponent'
const SomeComponent = getLocationAwareComponent(someComponent)

// in render method:
<SomeComponent someProp={value} />

You'll notice I import the default export of my component as humble camel-case, which lets me name the new, location-aware component in CamelCase so I can use it normally. Other than the additional import line and the assignment line, the component behaves as expected and receives all its props normally, with the addition of all the route props. Thus, I can happily redirect from component lifecycle methods with this.props.history.push(), check the location, etc.

Hope this helps!

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