Changing the child element's CSS when the parent is hovered

Hartley Brody Source

First of all, I'm assuming this is too complex for CSS3, but if there's a solution in there somewhere, I'd love to go with that instead.

The HTML is pretty straightforward.

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 1
    </div>
</div>

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 2
    </div>
</div>

The child div is set to display:none; by default, but then changes to display:block; when the mouse is hovered over the parent div. The problem is that this markup appears in several places on my site, and I only want the child to be displayed if the mouse is over it's parent, and not if the mouse is over any of the other parents (they all have the same class name and no IDs).

I've tried using $(this) and .children() to no avail.

$('.parent').hover(function(){
            $(this).children('.child').css("display","block");
        }, function() {
            $(this).children('.child').css("display","none");
        });
jquerycssjquery-selectorsparent

Answers

answered 7 years ago Stephen #1

Why not just use CSS?

.parent:hover .child, .parent.hover .child { display: block; }

and then add JS for IE6 (inside a conditional comment for instance) which doesn't support :hover properly:

jQuery('.parent').hover(function () {
    jQuery(this).addClass('hover');
}, function () {
    jQuery(this).removeClass('hover');
});

Here's a quick example: Fiddle

answered 7 years ago Hussein #2

Use toggleClass().

$('.parent').hover(function(){
$(this).find('.child').toggleClass('color')
});

where color is the class. You can style the class as you like to achieve the behavior you want. The example demonstrates how class is added and removed upon mouse in and out.

Check Working example here.

answered 7 years ago Roger Roelofs #3

Stephen's answer is correct but here's my adaptation of his answer:

HTML

<div class="parent">
    <p> parent 1 </p>
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 1
    </div>
</div>

<div class="parent">
    <p> parent 2 </p>
    <div class="child">
        Text Block 2
    </div>
</div>

CSS

.parent { width: 100px; min-height: 100px; color: red; }
.child { width: 50px; min-height: 20px; color: blue; display: none; }
.parent:hover .child, .parent.hover .child { display: block; }

jQuery

//this is only necessary for IE and should be in a conditional comment

jQuery('.parent').hover(function () {
    jQuery(this).addClass('hover');
}, function () {
    jQuery(this).removeClass('hover');
});

You can see this example working over at jsFiddle.

answered 6 years ago z666zz666z #4

I have what i think is a better solution, since it is scalable to more levels, as many as wanted, not only two or three.

I use borders, but it can also be done with whateever style wanted, like background-color.

With the border, the idea is to:

  • Have a different border color only one div, the div over where the mouse is, not on any parent, not on any child, so it can be seen only such div border in a different color while the rest stays on white.

You can test it at: http://jsbin.com/ubiyo3/13

And here is the code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title>Hierarchie Borders MarkUp</title>
<style>

  .parent { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 0;
            height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
          }

  .parent-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
               position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
               border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
             }
  .parent-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

  .child { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 1; 
           height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
         }

  .child-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
              position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
              border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
            }
  .child-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

  .grandson { display: block; position: relative; z-index: 2; 
              height: auto; width: auto; padding: 25px;
            }

  .grandson-bg { display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; 
                 position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; 
                 border: 1px solid white; z-index: 0; 
               }
  .grandson-bg:hover { border: 1px solid red; }

</style>
</head>
<body>
  <div class="parent">
    Parent
    <div class="child">
      Child
      <div class="grandson">
        Grandson
        <div class="grandson-bg"></div>
      </div>
      <div class="child-bg"></div>
    </div>
    <div class="parent-bg"></div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>

answered 6 years ago Ali Adravi #5

No need to use the JavaScript or jquery, CSS is enough:

.child{ display:none; }
.parent:hover .child{ display:block; }

SEE DEMO

answered 4 years ago R Tobin #6

If you're using Twitter Bootstrap styling and base JS for a drop down menu:

.child{ display:none; }
.parent:hover .child{ display:block; }

This is the missing piece to create sticky-dropdowns (that aren't annoying)

  • The behavior is to:
    1. Stay open when clicked, close when clicking again anywhere else on the page
    2. Close automatically when the mouse scrolls out of the menu's elements.

answered 3 years ago Amir Rahman #7

.parent:hover > .child {
    /*do anything with this child*/
}

answered 1 year ago hamboy75 #8

To change it from css you dont even need to set the child class

.parent > div:nth-child(1) { display:none; }
.parent:hover > div:nth-child(1) { display: block; }

answered 7 months ago Brian Leishman #9

Not sure if there's terrible reasons to do this or not, but it seems to work with me on the latest version of Chrome/Firefox without any visible performance problems with quite a lot of elements on the page.

*:not(:hover)>.parent-hover-show{
    display:none;
}

But this way, all you need is to apply parent-hover-show to an element and the rest is taken care of, and you can keep whatever default display type you want without it always being "block" or making multiple classes for each type.

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